What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia

September 14, 2021

Guide to Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia is a condition where the adrenal gland does not make enough cortisol and aldosterone, which is an important hormone for the body. This can lead to serious health problems – from minor issues like skin allergies, to life-threatening heart arrhythmias. A guide to CAH, a genetic disorder that affects around one in every 3,500 people worldwide. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) is a medical condition that causes an excess of androgens. It can affect both sexes and is often diagnosed in childhood. CAH is the most common endocrine cause of ambiguous genitalia in females and males with pseudohermaphroditism. Women with a history of Cushing’s syndrome and their families often ask “Can I have another baby?” in response to the news that they tested positive for the condition. The answer is complicated, and there are lots of factors to consider.

What is Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH)?

CAH is a disorder where the body produces an excess of androgens or male hormones. The most common type is 17-hydroxyprogesterone, but there are others. CAH causes abnormal development in early stages of the reproductive system, including the genitalia, urethra, vagina, uterus, breasts, and adrenal glands. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, also known as CAH, is a congenital adrenal disorder that affects about 1 in 2,500 female births. It is the most common genetic cause of ambiguous genitalia. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia is a genetic disorder that affects the body’s ability to produce and respond to cortisol, a hormone which regulates metabolism and controls the way the body stores and uses energy. CAH causes a person to have multiple physical traits typically associated with being female or having some other sex-related condition.

Symptoms and Treatment for CAH

A key part of the diagnosis is checking for the presence of androgen excess. A series of adrenal ultrasound tests can be used to measure androgen levels in your system, with a quantitative blood test being used to confirm androgen excess. These tests and treatment will only occur during the initial evaluation process. Adrenal Hyperplasia presents as a number of symptoms that vary from mild to severe. They include: In many cases, there is no treatment. However, an individual might be able to find a good diet that can aid in maintaining a healthy weight and blood sugar levels, as well as avoiding severe health problems. For the smallest percentage of individuals with CAH, a mild amount of glucocorticoids is necessary for proper growth and development.

Side Effects of Treatment

The side effects of treatment are diverse. Women may experience temporary infertility, weight gain, hair loss, fatigue, skin problems, or an increased risk of osteoporosis. On the other hand, men may see a decrease in sex drive or an increase in body hair. One of the most common side effects is low blood pressure. The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and they make hormones like cortisol, adrenaline, and aldosterone. When these organs are damaged, there may be an excessive amount of cortisol in the blood causing irritability, fatigue, headaches, nausea, or heart palpitations. Sometimes, people are born with a condition that requires them to be on hormone replacement therapy. This is typically done through taking Hormone Replacement Therapy tablets of one type or another, typically for life. Another treatment option for CAH is hormone therapy with tablets or injections. This treatment is usually given on an outpatient basis and will vary depending on the severity of the CAH symptoms.

How to Raise Awareness about CAH

Some people with CAH may experience symptoms such as salt and water retention, higher blood pressure, and certain reproductive issues. This issue is often misunderstood and many patients feel they are too embarrassed to talk about it with others. Education about CAH is important in order to raise awareness and provide support for people living with this condition. CAH is a condition that affects the adrenal glands. It can lead to early-onset or late-onset. Early-onset CAH is the most common form of this condition, and it can cause female sex characteristics at a very young age. The symptoms for this type of CAH are not always apparent in infants, but they may include learning disabilities or intellectual problems, weakness, fatigue, and changes in appetite. Late-onset CAH may be more severe than the early-onset form, but many times it is less noticeable to parents because their children are diagnosed A CAH diagnosis is not always the end of the world, and raising awareness is one way to help with that. Just keep in mind that every person is different and what may be a good idea for others may not be so great for you. If you have further questions about how to raise awareness, feel free to contact CAH Foundation at info@cahfoundation.org

Conclusion

The tips given in this blog are to help you get started with CAH. Remember not to go through any extreme steps because CAH is a serious condition, and could lead to life-threatening complications if not monitored. CAH is a condition that affects females more than males. It’s caused by the body’s inability to produce cortisol, which is one of the hormones needed for the production of blood sugar. This disorder can be detected in utero or during infancy because CAH can produce symptoms during childhood. All you need to know about CAH is here, and it doesn’t sound like such a bad thing.

 

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